HIGH SCHOOL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

EASTSIDE CHRISTIAN HIGH SCHOOL
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 
Not all courses are offered every semester.

BIBLE

 

Students are required to submit proof of fifteen hours of community service per semester in each Bible course.

 

BIBLE 9 - CHRISTIANITY AND THE MIND

Text – NIV Bible; Walt Russell, Playing with Fire; JP Moreland, Scaling the Secular City; Dean Halverson, The Compact Guide to World Religions

The development of our minds for Christ is paramount to a life lived out for our Lord.  We dare not neglect the deep intellectual truths of Christianity. It is our earnest desire to see our students be able to dialogue cogently and ardently about the Bible and the Christian faith. They will be equipped use their minds to answer intelligently various opposing viewpoints. Their faith will be bolstered as they are equipped to answer the challenges from the world’s point of view. The first semester will focus on hermeneutics and apologetics. The second semester will deal with world religions and cults.  

 

BIBLE 10 - CHRISTIANITY AND THE HISTORY

Texts – NIV Bible; Curtis, Lang and Petersen, The 100 Most Important Events In Christian History; Tony Lane, Exploring Christian Thought

In Christianity and the Church, we realize there is a beauty to understanding the roots and growth of the Christian church. To know where we are going, we must know where we have been. The goal of tenth grade Bible is to allow our students to understand the growth of the church from its beginnings in first century Jerusalem to the current world wide reach.  We will see the church and her interaction with society politically, socially, artistically and spiritually.  In the first semester we will deal with the early church through the reformation.  The second semester will focus on the post-reformation movements through the modern church.

 

BIBLE 11 - CHRISTIANITY AND THE HEART

Texts – NIV Bible; Richard Foster,  Celebration of Discipline; Brother Andrew, God’s Smuggler

Our heart, the command center for our very being, must not be neglected. To live a full Christian life, we must add to the intellectual the movement of our hearts.  “For out of the overflow of our hearts the mouth speaks…”  The eleventh grade class will dive into the development of our heart. In our first semester together we will search ourselves and discover and develop our spiritual gifts.  We will see what the church should be and how the spiritual disciplines will not only change us but will change our churches.  The following semester will find us dealing with a heart of service, what it means to put others’ interests above our own in outreach, missions and evangelism.

 

BIBLE 12 - CHRISTIANITY AND THE SOUL

Text – NIV Bible; Millard Erickson, Introducing Christian Doctrine; Philip Yancey, The Jesus I Never Knew

When our soul rests on solid ground, our actions will glorify God. It is our desire to take all we have learned throughout the previous years and come to a focus of firm belief.  We will look deeply in the Scriptures and develop a Biblical viewpoint on a host of important issues.  In our first semester we will discover what the Bible says about God, His revelation, nature and work.  We will be informed on the Bible’s position in regards to humanity and sin.  The second semester will open up into an understanding of the Bible’s teaching on Christ, the Holy Spirit, salvation and  the Church.

 

ENGLISH

 

ENGLISH 9

Textbook: Gold, Prentice Hall, 1999.

As an introduction to literature, composition and speech, this course explores the various genres in reading and the building blocks of each. Students will exercise their skills of analysis and critical thinking through challenging and foundational reading, expository and descriptive writing and formal and informal speeches.

 

ENGLISH 10

Textbook: Literature: World Masterpieces, Prentice Hall, 1999.

This chronological study of World literature begins with the ancients and culminates with contemporary thought. Through challenging and foundational reading, students will exercise their skills of analysis and critical thinking; practice their expository, reflective, descriptive and research writing skills; and practice delivering speeches.

 

HONORS ENGLISH 10

Textbook: Literature: World Masterpieces, Prentice Hall, 1999.

This chronological study of World literature begins with the ancients and culminates with contemporary thought. Through challenging and foundational reading, students will exercise their skills of analysis and critical thinking; practice their expository, reflective, descriptive and research writing skills; and practice delivering speeches. As a honors level course, the depth of analysis of material will be more sophisticated, the amount of reading and writing will be more extensive, and the pace quicker than in the college prep level.

 

ENGLISH 11

Textbook: Literature: The American Experience, Prentice Hall, 1999.

This chronological study of American literature begins with the Puritan Era in the 1640’s and culminates with contemporary American thought. Through challenging and foundational reading, students will exercise their skills of analysis and critical thinking, and practice their expository, reflective, descriptive and research writing skills.

 

HONORS ENGLISH 11

Textbook: Literature: The American Experience, Prentice Hall, 1999.

This chronological study of American literature begins with the Puritan Era in the 1640’s and culminates with contemporary American thought. Through challenging and foundational reading, students will exercise their skills of analysis and critical thinking, and practice their expository, reflective, descriptive and research writing skills. As a honors level course, the depth of analysis of material will be more sophisticated, the amount of reading and writing will be more extensive, and the pace quicker than in the college prep level. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

 

ENGLISH 12

Textbook: Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes, Prentice Hall, 1999.

This chronological study of British literature covers the development of thought in the great body of letters in the English language. Through challenging and foundational reading, students will exercise their skills of analysis and critical thinking, and practice their expository, reflective, descriptive and research writing skills.

 

AP ENGLISH 12

Text: Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama, by X.J.Kennedy and Dana Gioia

This course is a rigorous study of language and literature designed for the college preparatory student seeking academic challenges.  The curriculum incorporates many of the elements of a college-level English composition and literature program.  The course is built around in-depth studies of classic and modern literature chosen from the suggested list for the Advanced Placement program.  Students are expected to engage in literature in a personal and analytical way, developing critical thinking skills, as well as increasing their mastery of the language.  Assessment is both oral and written, with the emphasis on developing students who can respond to works of great complexity and depth in an articulate manner.  AP English seeks to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examinations. 

HISTORY

 

GEOGRAPHY 9

Text: World History, Connections to Today, Prentice Hall.

This class examines major global trends and issues in the context of studying the physical and political geography of different world regions.

 

HISTORY 10 - WESTERN CIVILIZATIONS

Texts: World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall

This is a survey course of European and modern history.  Aside from learning about the events that have shaped history, students will also learn how to use critical thinking skills, applicable to every area of life.

 

HISTORY 11 - US HISTORY

Text: The United States, A History of the Republic, Prentice Hall. 

This course covers America’s history from the age of Discovery to Modern America. This course deals with several important themes: the growth of national unity; the diversity of the population; and the development of a democratic institution. History 11 is aligned to the California State Social Studies Content Studies, a copy of which is available at www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/hstgrade11.asp. Students who successfully complete this course will have a working knowledge of the U.S. Constitution, the history of the United States from the Civil War to present day, and how historical events impact current events.

 

AP HISTORY 11 - AP US HISTORY

Text: The American Pageant, by Thomas Bailey; American Political Traditions, by Richard Hofstadter.

This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance —and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. This course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. Students who successfully complete this course will have a working knowledge of the U.S. Constitution, the history of the United States from the Civil War to present day, and how historical events impact on current events. Test taking strategies and practice of Document Based Questions (DBQ) essays will be a major focus of the class. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

 

HISTORY 12 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (ONE SEMESTER)

Text: Continuity and Chance, Prentice Hall.

This course is an overview of the inner workings of the government in America. It explores the roots and the foundational federal system and how each component works together in a representative democracy. This course emphasizes the importance of being civically minded.

 

HISTORY 12 - ECONOMICS (ONE SEMESTER)

Text: Economics: Principles and Practices, Glencoe.

This course will study how people choose from the limited resources to meet their needs and wants.  This course will also examine the framework of Business in America. In this course students will pursue a deeper understanding of the economic systems.  They conduct an in-depth study of the economic systems in the world today analyze the impact governments make on local and national economies.  An emphasis is placed on analyzing the relationship among federal, state, and local governments.  This course will create civic literacy as students prepare to vote, participate in community activities and assume the responsibilities of citizenship. Students will demonstrate the ability to think critically, learn autonomously and to solve problems by effectively by extrapolating concepts learned in class to active participation in their community.  

 

AP HISTORY 12 - AP GOVERNMENT

Text: American Government and Politics Today: Schmidt, Shelley, Bardes Thomson/Wadsworth Inc. Belmont, CA 2005.

In this course students will pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American Government.  They will do an in-depth study of the system of government in the world today and analyze the life and changing interpretations of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the current state of the legislative, executive and judiciary branches of government.  An emphasis is placed on analyzing the relationship among federal, state, and local governments, and on the court cases that built our system.  This course will create civic literacy as students prepare to vote, participate in community activities and assume the responsibilities of citizenship. Students who successfully complete this course will have a working knowledge of how government works in the United States from its historical roots to its practical application. The objective of this course is to teach the skills necessary to pass and excel on the AP American History test, given this year (2009) in May. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

MATHEMATICS

 

INTERMEDIATE MATH

Text: Holt McDougal Mathematics Grade 6,  

In this class, students will get a chance to review areas of math in which they have previously struggled.  Some of the topics reviewed are: addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers; solving simple equations; ratios and percents; and geometry.  Students will also expand their mathematical knowledge by learning to solve more complex equations, by working with polynomials, by graphing linear functions, and by studying square roots and the Pythagorean Theorem.

 

PRE-ALGEBRA

Text:Holt McDougal Mathematics Grade 7

Although this course does review some of the mathematical concepts that students have previously learned, the main emphasis is to prepare them for Algebra I.  This is accomplished by reviewing operations with integers, solving more complex equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations and inequalities, working with more complex polynomials, and learning about trigonometric functions.

 

ALGEBRA 1

Text: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) Fuse: Algebra 1. (Application for iPads)

This is a beginning course in Algebra based on the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.  At this college prep level math, students will solve systems of equations, work with and apply rational numbers, explore inequalities and polynomials, factor polynomials, graph linear equations, and simplify radical expressions.

 

ALGEBRA 1A

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) Fuse: Algebra 1 (Application for iPads)

This is the first of two years of a beginning course in Algebra based on the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.  At this level of math, students will solve systems of equations, work with and apply rational numbers, explore inequalities and polynomials, factor polynomials, graph linear equations, and simplify radical expressions.

 

ALGEBRA 1B

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) Fuse: Algebra 1(Application for iPads)

This is the second of two years of a beginning course in Algebra based on the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.  At this level of math, students will solve systems of equations, work with and apply rational numbers, explore inequalities and polynomials, factor polynomials, graph linear equations, and simplify radical expressions.

 

GEOMETRY

Text: Glencoe Geometry, Glencoe/ McGraw Hill  2001. (Application for iPads)

After successfully completing Algebra I, students in geometry will perform basic proofs and constructions, explore the area and volume of geometric figures, learn more about circles, and study transformations. They will also compare deductive and inductive logical arguments.

 

ALGEBRA 2 (PRE-REQUISITE: "C" OR BETTER IN ALGEBRA 1)

Text: Glencoe Algebra 2:  Integration Applications Connections, Glencoe/ McGraw Hill  1998. (Application for iPads)

Students at this level will perform mastery in solving equations and inequalities, linear relations and functions, matrices, polynomials, irrational and complex numbers, quadratic relations and function conics, exponential and logarithmic functions.  They will also address statistics, probability and trigonometric functions. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

 

PRE-CALCULUS (PRE-REQUISITE: "C" OR BETTER IN ALGEBRA 2)

Text: Pre Calculus with Limits: A Graphing Approach, Houghton Mifflin Co. 2001.

This advanced level will expand on solving systems of equations and inequalities, the nature of graphs, polynomial and rational functions, graphs and inverses of the trigonometric functions, vectors and parametric equations, polar coordinates, and exponential and logarithmic functions.  Analytic geometry in two and three dimensions is surveyed as one. Limits and an introduction to calculus are also covered. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

 

CALCULUS AB

Text: Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, by Ross L. Finney and Prentice Hall Staff., 2006.

This college level math class takes students to a more sophisticated level where they will learn limits, derivatives, antiderivatives (integration), exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, systems of equations, and analytic geometry. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

 

CALCULUS BC

Text: Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, by Ross L. Finney and Prentice Hall Staff., 2006.

This college level math class takes students to a more sophisticated level where they will learn limits, derivatives, antiderivatives (integration), exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, systems of equations, and analytic geometry. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

SCIENCE

 

HEALTH

Text: Glencoe Health, Merki and Merki, 2004

The purpose of this one semester Independent Study course is to gain an understanding of the importance of a healthy lifestyle as well as gain knowledge in the areas of health related health issues, including exercise, nutrition, the negative consequences of habitual substance abuse, and an understanding of the biological systems of the human body, driving safety, and sexual education. Students will understand a healthy life that God has intended for us. Students will also understand social and cultural influences and how they affect the decisions we make.

 

SCIENCE SPECTRUM

Text:  Science Spectrum:  A Physical Approach, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 2001.

Science Spectrum is aligned with the California State Standards and the National Science Education Standards and is taught with a Biblical view of God as the Creator. This course encompasses the laws, theories, and principles of physical science in the areas of matter, motion and energy, wave and wave properties, electricity and magnetism, and Earth and space.  The biological concepts of cells and ecology will also be introduced.  Laboratory work will emphasize the application of the scientific method and the use of laboratory equipment and technique.  Projects and optional assignments will allow students to apply reasoning and critical thinking skills to their study of science. This class does not meet the UC  a-g requirement for a lab science.

 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

Text: Hole’s Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology, Shier, Butler, Lewis, 2006

This course is designed to give to student’s detailed knowledge of the various structures of the human body as well as the functions of these structures. This includes the skeletal system, muscular system, digestive system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, endocrine system, respiratory system, nervous system, and the integumentary system. Students will gain knowledge of the diseases and injuries that affect these systems. This class does not meet the UC  a-g requirement for a lab science.

 

BIOLOGY (PRE-REQUISITE: STAFF RECOMMENDATION)

Text:  Biology:  Dynamics of Life, Glencoe/McGraw Hill, 2000.

Biology is aligned with the California Standards and the National Science Education Standards and is taught with a Biblical view of God as the Creator.  This course will cover the concepts of ecology, cells, genetics, and the human body.  Students will also be introduced to viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, invertebrates and vertebrates.  There will be an emphasis on biological themes: Unity within Diversity, Evolutionary theory, Energy, Homeostasis, Systems and Interactions, and The Nature of Science. Laboratory work will emphasize the application of the scientific method and the use of laboratory equipment and technique.  Students will design their own experiments.  Projects and optional assignments will allow students to apply reasoning and critical thinking skills to their study of biology. 

 

CHEMISTRY (PRE-REQUISITE: A "C" OR BETTER IN BIOLOGY AND ALGEBRA 1)

Text:  Chemistry, Wilbraham, Staley, Matta, Waterman; Prentice Hall, 2007.

Chemistry is aligned with the California State Standards and the National Science Education Standards and is taught with a Biblical view of God as the Creator.  .This course will cover the concepts of matter, scientific measurement, atomic structure, electrons in atoms, periodic table, ionic, metallic, and covalent bonding, chemical names and formulas,  chemical quantities, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, gases, water, solutions, thermochemistry,  reaction rates and equilibrium, acids, bases, and salts, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.  Laboratory work will emphasize the application of the scientific method and the use of laboratory equipment and technique.  Students will design their own experiments.  Projects and optional assignments will allow students to apply reasoning and critical thinking skills to their study of chemistry.

 

PHYSICS (PRE-REQUISITE: A "C" OR BETTER IN CHEMISTRY; PRECIOUS OR CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT IN ALGEBRA 2)

Text: Holt Physics, Holt, Rinehart and Winston  2002. 

As a basic physics course, forces and the laws of motion are studied. Fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and vibrations are examined. Light reflection, refraction, interference, and diffraction are studied. Electricity and magnetisms are broken down into constituent parts (fields, capacitance, resistance and current) and studied in the framework of circuits.

Basic concepts in relativity and quantum mechanics will be explored. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

 

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (PRE-REQUISITE: A "C" OR BETTER IN BIOLOGY AND GEOMETRY)

Text: Living in the Environment, 12 ed. by G. Tyler Miller Jr., Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning, 2000.

AP Environmental Science provides instruction in Earth Systems and Resources, The Living World, Population, Land and Water Use, Energy Resources and Consumption, Pollution, Global Change.

The course provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world; included methods for analyzing and interpreting information and experimental data, including mathematical calculations; and teaches students how to identify and analyze environmental problems, to evaluate the ecological and human health risks associated with these problems, and to critically examine various solutions for resolving or preventing them.  The course includes a laboratory and/or field investigation component. A minimum of one hour per week is required outside of class spent engaged in laboratory and/or field work.

 

AP BIOLOGY (PRE-REQUISITE: A "C" OR BETTER IN BOTH BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY)

Text:  Biology (Fifth Edition) Benjamin/Cummings, an imprint of Addison Wesley Longman, Inc.

The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year.  After showing themselves to be qualified on the AP exam, some students, in their freshman year, are permitted to take the next level of biology coursework.  This course aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.  There is an important lab component of this course that emphasizes the application of the scientific method and the use of laboratory equipment and technique.  Students will also design their own experiments.  There will be an emphasis on the AP biology themes:  Science as a Process, Evolution, Energy Transfer, Continuity and Change, Relationship of Structure to Function, Regulation, Interdependence in Nature, and Science, Technology, and Society.  Projects and optional assignments will allow students to apply reasoning and critical thinking skills to their study of AP biology. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester; extended time outside of class may be required for labs and AP test practice.

 

AP CHEMISTRY (PRE-REQUISITE: A "C" OR BETTER IN BOTH BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY)

Text:  Chemistry (Eighth Edition) Zumdahl/Zumdahl, Cengage Learning, 2010.

The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory chemistry course usually taken by chemistry majors during their first year.  After showing themselves to be qualified on the AP exam, some students, in their freshman year, are permitted to take the next level of chemistry coursework.  This course aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the science of chemistry.  There is an important lab component of this course that emphasizes the application of the scientific method and the use of laboratory equipment and technique.  Students will also design their own experiments.  There will be an emphasis on the AP chemistry themes. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester; extended time outside of class may be required for labs and AP test practice.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

SPANISH 1

Text: Paso a Paso 1, Scott Foresman 1996.

This is a beginning course in the Spanish language. Vocabulary includes basic greetings, school subjects and supplies, favorite pastimes, family members, health and personal preferences. Grammar is taught in conversational context with activities, using verbs in simple present, present conditional and two past tenses. Other grammar includes use of nouns, pronouns, adjectives and information necessary for correct sentence structure. As a language course, vocabulary and grammar build on previously learned Spanish. Spanish 1 is an introductory course for students wishing to learn a foreign language. The intent is to develop basic communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The emphasis is on developing the ability to converse fluently with accurate pronunciation, while developing an appreciation of the culture.

 

SPANISH 2 (PRE-REQUISITE: "B" OR BETTER IN SPANISH A AND SPANISH B, OR "C" OR BETTER IN SPANISH 1)

Texts: Paso a Paso 2, Scott Foresman 1996. (Pre-requisite: “B” or better in Spanish A and Spanish B, or “C” or better in Spanish 1.)

This is an intermediate level course in the Spanish language. The basis for the course is a mastery of Spanish 1. Vocabulary includes daily activities, clothing and colors, shopping, accidents, types of movies and entertainment and travel. Grammar is taught in conversional context with activities, using all the verb tenses learned in Spanish 1, the future conditional, simple future and subjunctive tenses. Other grammar includes use of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs and other information necessary for correct sentence structure. As a language course, vocabulary and grammar build on previously learned Spanish. Spanish 2 continues an exploration of the Spanish language, with an emphasis on oral conversations in real life contexts.  Students will enhance their abilities to listen, speak, read and write, with the goal of developing the ability to express themselves in the past, present, and future.  Additional emphasis will be focused on reading comprehension in Spanish.

 

SPANISH 3 (PRE-REQUISITE: "C" OR BETTER IN SPANISH 2)

Text: Paso a Paso 3, Scott Foresman 1996.

This is an intermediate to advanced level course in the Spanish language. The basis for the course is a mastery of Spanish 1 and a year of Spanish 2. Vocabulary topics include personal characteristics, places to live, works of art, television and the media, the community, jobs and cultures. Grammar is taught in conversational context with activities, using all verb tenses learned in Spanish 1 and 2, the reflexive, verbs with spelling changes, and verb phrases. Other grammar includes reflexive pronouns, direct and indirect objects, adverb phrases and idioms. As a language course, vocabulary and grammar build on previously learned Spanish. Students develop a more authentic fluency in Spanish 3, with an emphasis on oral conversations in real life contexts.  Students will sharpen their abilities to listen, speak, read and write in Spanish, with the goal of expressing themselves accurately using new verb tenses—commands, conditional phrases, and the subjunctive.  Students master their use of pronouns and possessive adjectives in weekly conversations and dialogues.  Students will deepen their vocabulary and ability to use it in context by forming more complex sentences and being able to sustain lengthy conversations.  

 

SPANISH 4 (PRE-REQUISITE: "C" OR BETTER IN SPANISH 3)

Text: Abriendo Paso Lectura. Jose M. Diaz, 2007; Complete Spanish Grammar, Gilda Nissenberg, 2004

Spanish 4 is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 3, and wish to further their Spanish studies. Students will be invited to revisit the topics studied in Spanish 3, but will be required to delve deeper into more extensive literature text in order to analyze and compare. They will reach further into their cultural knowledge in order to be able to express and defend opinions, and further refine and develop their language skills through mastery of more complex and detailed grammar points. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

 

AP SPANISH (PRE-REQUISITE: "C" OR BETTER IN SPANISH 4, OR TEACHER RECOMMENDATION AFTER SPANISH 3)

Text: Triangulo, Barbara Gatski and John McMullan, 2006.

Students in AP Spanish master college level proficiency in Spanish as they concentrate on literature, composition, and extended conversation in Spanish to prepare for the AP Spanish test. The AP Spanish Language course is conducted in Spanish.  Students are encouraged to commit to speaking Spanish exclusively during class time.  The students will be expected to demonstrate understanding of spoken and written Spanish presented through a variety of mediums. This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester.

Business & Technology

 

INTRO TO IWORKS AND IPAD2

This class is designed to teach students to work with computer applications including document, spreadsheet, and presentation software.   In today’s fast-paced, digital world, students need to know how to use new technology with confidence.  In his letter to the Corinthians, Paul said that he had “become all things to all people so that by all possible means I might save some.”  (1 Corinthians 9:22)  Our students will be able to use the latest technology to impact the world for God’s plans. By the end of the semester, students will be able to:

  • create and format a document, including adding photos, charts, and graphs

  • create and animate a slideshow presentation

  • create a spreadsheet and use basic functions

Students will have developed:

  • internet research skills

  • an increased awareness of  internet safety

  • an increased understanding of personal responsibility when publishing online

 

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS

Students will explore the various communication skills necessary in business. Strategies include interview techniques, resume writing, formal and informal speeches, letter writing. This course is primarily independent study. 

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS

 

ART

HS Art students will have an opportunity to explore a variety of art experiences utilizing a vast array of art mediums. Regardless of prior art experience, students will be encouraged to utilize artistic expression following the example of the Master Creator.

 

ART II

Art II students have taken a year of Art 1, and will engage in advanced artistic activities that will build upon Art 1 experiences. Students will apply their knowledge of the elements and principles of art and the use of various media to create work that is excellent and meaningful. Reflective critiques and exhibits will be shared with students of all art levels. Students in this course will prepare a portfolio of their work that can be used for the Advanced Placement Art course. 

 

AP STUDIO ART

Independent Study portfolio creation for submission to College Board.

 

CHOIR

This group is designed to cultivate the vocal instrument, and use it in the performance of choral literature.  Each student will master concepts in a variety of choral styles.  This group may be comprised of high school and junior high students, and will perform in several concerts, chapels and other venues throughout the year.  In addition to the vocal experience, this course includes teaching the correct terminology of music, vocal pedagogy, artistic and creative expression and basic notation and theory. This is a yearlong class.

 

THEATER

This is a yearlong class, and may not be dropped after the first week of the first semester. Students will learn theater terms, and elements of performance and production. Students will be required to participate in one production each semester.  

 

PHOTOGRAPHY

Digital Photography will cover technical aspects of camera handling, composition, and presentation of photographs, and an introduction to the history of photography: a study of famous photographers and their works.  Students will learn the basics of Photoshop as well as how to analyze and evaluate work.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

High school students are required to take at least four semesters of physical education. This can be accomplished by participating in four seasons of the same sport, of four or more seasons of different sports. Students will be introduced to the skills, rules and play of the sport they choose, and will be required to attend and participate in competitions. Every effort is made to expose each student to the aspects and knowledge involved in physical fitness as a lifelong priority. Field and classroom work will be done to expose the student to activities involved in sports skills for leisure time and athletics.

LEADERSHIP

 

ASB

The objective of this course is to use the leadership skills learned in the classroom to create, operate and fundraise for events such as dances and socials at Eastside Christian High School, and to serve as examples of proper deportment at these events. Students will fill board positions, head committees, and be responsible for all activities on campus by utilizing communication, time management, goal setting, interpersonal relations, organization,and more. Students are expected to actively participate in all ASB events. 

 

PRAISE TEAM

In addition to leading worship during weekly chapels, students will understand foundational and practical issues of making worship meaningful and inspiring. Students will worship God through a variety of artistic expressions, and are expected to participate in leading chapel services.

 

YEARBOOK

Journalism /Yearbook is designed to be a student driven class with strict deadlines and extended extracurricular involvement. An award winning publication, the yearbook is produced by students selected through an application process who learn layout, photography and copy writing to create a treasure of memories for all. This class is considered Independent Study; students work independently with the Advisor, but earn credits and grades. 

 

SENIOR SEMINAR

This class is required for seniors, and is designed to assist seniors in preparing for their future after high school.  Students will concentrate on their required Senior Project in this course, and all senior activities will be communicated through this class. Focusing on skills students will need for for life, this course includes choosing a college, applying and planning for life in college.

K-12 Campus - Elementary | Jr High | High School     1701 West Valencia Drive, Fullerton, CA 92833         714-253-4556        contact@eastsidechristian.org